New Evidence of Age Bias in Hiring, and a Push to Fight It

With a small pension and Social Security, he said, he and his wife are “just getting by.” “It’s devastating,” Mr. Adair said. “You go through the stages just like dying. First you can’t believe it. You’re so sure and your wife is so sure, and even the recruiter is. Then you get mad.” By the end, you feel like giving up, he said. Wanted: Greener Employees Hiring complaints and lawsuits are rarely filed because they are difficult to prove and the cost is high, said Robert E. Weisberg, a regional…

Planting the Seeds of a Story With Farmers in the Midwest

“It makes me feel really good to hear Trump say farmers are important to this country,” he said. “That’s what makes me want to stick with the president.” And while he hopes the trade fight is settled soon, he doesn’t think trade is the “silver bullet” that is going to solve farmers’ problems. When heavy morning rains canceled the next day’s planting, I toured Countryside Cooperative’s grain elevator and storage bins, which Shane and farmers in the surrounding counties use. There, Mike Christenson, the agronomy supervisor, was dealing with the…

What Reparations for Slavery Might Look Like in 2019

William A. Darity Jr., an economist at Duke University and a leading scholar on reparations, suggests two qualifying conditions: having at least one ancestor who was enslaved in the United States, and having identified oneself as African-American on a legal document for at least a decade before the approval of any reparations. The 10-year rule, he said, would help screen out anyone trying to cash in on a windfall. According to these criteria, Oprah Winfrey, who has traced her DNA to slaves captured in West Africa in the early 19th…

Pain of Tariffs Tests Farmers’ Faith in Trump: ‘How Long Is Short-Term?’

Many farmers are. In North Carolina, Ms. Overman, 57, said she could not handle another bad year. Last season, she lost $450,000 when most of her wheat and soybeans were wiped out by a hurricane, the second in three years. Her son and son-in-law have both come home to farm. “But neither of them wants to plant one grain because they see no future in it,” she said. “They would be seventh generation, but they’re tired of going to the bank and getting a loan and not being able to…