Uber Drivers Are Contractors, Not Employees, Labor Board Says

But, citing a federal appeals court decision, the memo also said the “animating principle” used to make the determination of contractor status was whether the worker had an opportunity to profit from the activity in the way an entrepreneur would. “The drivers had significant entrepreneurial opportunity by virtue of their near complete control of their cars and work schedules, together with freedom to choose login locations and to work for competitors of Uber,” the memo stated. Marshall Babson, a former labor board member appointed by President Ronald Reagan who is…

Labor Dept. Says Workers at a Gig Company Are Contractors

The Labor Department weighed in Monday on a question whose answer could be worth billions of dollars to gig-economy companies, deciding that one company’s workers were contractors, not employees. The move provides further evidence that the Trump administration is departing from the approach of its predecessor on a key employment issue. Gig companies are assuming a more prominent role in the economy, and many are beginning to sell shares to the public. But industry officials estimate that requiring such companies to classify their workers as employees would raise their labor…

U.S. Moves to Limit Wage Claims Against Chains Like McDonald’s

The Labor Department released a proposal on Monday that would limit claims against big companies for employment-law violations by franchisees or contractors. The proposal, related to a concept called joint employment, seeks to define when, for example, employees of a locally owned McDonald’s restaurant could successfully take action against the McDonald’s Corporation over violations of minimum-wage and overtime laws. The proposal, which will require a 60-day public comment period before it can be finalized, could affect the ability of millions of workers pursuing wage claims. Franchisees and contractors can be…

Is Gig Work a Job? Uber and Others Are Maneuvering to Shape the Answer

It was a potentially sweeping proposal from a Texas regulator: Companies that use a “digital network” to dispatch workers the way Uber does could label them contractors rather than employees. The proposal, made in December, was a turning point in a campaign that has played out in legislatures and courts in numerous states, and even in Washington, as Uber and other gig-economy companies have risen to prominence in recent years. Lobbyists involved in this state-by-state effort have worked behind the scenes to provide rule makers with a template. Hanging in…

The Backdoor Move Uber and Others Are Using to Shape Labor Rules

It was a potentially sweeping proposal from a Texas regulator: Companies that use a “digital network” to dispatch workers the way Uber does could label them contractors rather than employees. The proposal, made in December, was a turning point in a campaign that has played out in legislatures and courts in numerous states, and even in Washington, as Uber and other gig-economy companies have risen to prominence in recent years. Lobbyists involved in this state-by-state effort have worked behind the scenes to provide rule makers with a template. Hanging in…